Scientist Profile

Dr. C. Gnanaseelan

Designation
: Scientist F

Phone
: +91-(0)20-25904273

Fax
: +91-(0)20-25865142

Email ID
: seelan[at]tropmet[dot]res[dot]in

Ocean Modelling
Degree University Year Stream
Ph.D. Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 1998 Mathematics
M.Tech. Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 1991 Atmospheric Science & Technology
M.Sc. Madurai Kamaraj University 1989 Mathematics
B.Sc. Madurai Kamaraj University 1987 Mathematics

  Understanding the Indian Ocean and its regional climatic impacts

  Data Assimilation

  Ocean Modelling

  Physical Oceanography

Award Name Awarded By Awarded For Year
28th Silver Jubilee Award for the year 2015 Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology Best Research paper 2016
3rd IITM Golden Jubilee Biennial Award Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology Outstanding contribution in the field of Atmosphere, Weather and Climate Science. 2016
Young Scientist Award with the Certificate of Merit Ministry of Earth Sciences, Govt. of India Outstanding contribution in the field of Atmospheric Sciences 2011
Year Designation Institute
2015-Present Scientist F Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, Pune
2010-2015 Scientist E Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology
2007-2010 Scientist D Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, Pune
2005-2007 Visiting Research Associate Florida State University, USA
2003-2007 Scientist C Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, Pune
1999-2003 Scientist B Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, Pune
1993-1999 R.A. (Scientific) Central Water & Power Research Station, Pune
1991-1993 Senior Research Fellow Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur

Research Highlight


Indian summer monsoon rainfall variability during 2014 and 2015 and associated Indo-Pacific upper ocean temperature patterns

The years 2014 and 2015 witnessed deficit ISM rainfall but were evolved from two entirely different preconditions over Pacific. This raises concern over the present understanding of the role of Pacific Ocean on ISM variability. Analysis reveals that the mechanisms associated with the rainfall deficit over the Indian Subcontinent are different in the two years. It is found that remote forcing in summer of 2015 due to El Niño is mostly responsible for the deficit monsoon rainfall through changes in Walker circulation and large-scale subsidence.

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